Aster ericoides Snow Flurry a must-have Fall perennial.

Aster ericoides Snow Flurry a must-have Fall perennial.

Aster ericoides Snow Flurry

A must-have Fall perennial that surprises and over-performs. These tiny daisy flowers are a delight when most gardens have an autumnal look with golden tones and rustic shades.

Aster ericoides Snow Flurry a must-have Fall perennial.

Aster ericoides Snow Flurry to your must-have plant list, and be-sure to check out my top five asters below for the pollinator friendly garden.

Covered in tiny white stars by late September Aster ericoides Snow Flurry is a very low, dense carpeting ground-cover that is smothered with tiny single white flowers with golden centers.

Deer resistant and trouble-free this Aster will be one of your fall flowering favorites.

A good strong grower and a ground-hugging plant this little aster can be used as a path edging or a late-flowering container plant for fall arrangements.

Instead of buying overly commercial short-lived chrysanthemums consider perennial Asters for late-season color and essential food for hungry pollinators.

Aster ericoides Snow Flurry is trouble free and will quickly form dense weed suppressing mats of horizontal stems.

Check out the following four perennial asters worthy of a place in any sunny wild-flower meadow.

Symphyotrichum (Aster) cordifolius ‘Little Carlow’ – Compact North American native be sure to make room for this well-behaved perennial beautiful Lilac colored daisy blooms.

Symphyotrichum (Aster) Snow Flurry

Baltonia asteroides – Thousand Stars – Native spreading perennial that is best cut back in late Spring to encourage a compact spreading habit.

Vernonia baldwinii – Aster family – Purple Ironweed late-flowering small purple tufts of blooms make this an attractive fall flowering perennial for the meadow or border.

Symphyotrichum (Aster) horizontalis ‘Lady in Black’ – Calico aster – strong horizontal stems on this black leaf perennial aster make a great talking point long before it flowers.

I find growing plants from seed incredibly rewarding, even the smallest of outdoor garden areas can be a productive workout for all the family. Try thinking of your garden as a living kitchen and grow to love fresh flowers, organic fruit, and vegetables straight from your own backyard oasis.

Stephen Pryce-Lea

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