Daffodils a bright beacon of hope for any era.

#Daffodils represented chivalry during the Victorian era, today that are a symbol of hope and really do come in all shapes and sizes. Gardeners looking to achieve a bright show of Spring flowering daffodils, ensure dried bulbs are planted in the autumn. Cold weather encourages root growth giving the bulb the opportunity to establish a proper root system in time for the formation of the heavy flowers and stems.

Small dainty nodding heads of the Cyclamineus type of daffodil with it’s single flower and reflexes petals remain incredibly popular due to size and easier to maintain.

The Snowdrop is often referred to as the bringer of Spring the Daffodils usually indicates it’s arrival. Hardy and all but tolerant of wet conditions that cause the bulb to rot. Daffodils can even withstand heavy snowfall their yellow headed beacons, bravely poking out over snow and ice.

Daffodils like Tulips are popular with florists and grown in abundance for the cut flower market due to the fact they hold there petals and stay fresh in a vase for several days. However daffodils are not good at sharing the vase with other flowers often causing the competition to fail.

Next up the Tulips get set for real show of hot colours and sleek upside down teardrop shaped flowers.

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Stephen Pryce-Lea

Head Gardener and International Horticultural Consulatant

 

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“It’s a beautiful thing when a career and a passion grow together, when you find it in a Garden it’s like finding Paradise“

iGrowHort – A Head Gardener’s Horticultural Journey of love, life and learning.

 

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